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, a new book looks at his little known legacy as a ground- breaking foreign-policy president. >> lincoln had to deal with a series of crises over the course of his presidency from france, from britain, from spain, even russian ships showed up off the atlantic coast. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel has launched new air strikes into syria. u.s. security officials say the attack came after nightfall, in the syrian port city of latakia after nightfall. the target was said to be russian-made, surface-to-ai
and probably don't like his anti-russian foreign policy. >> they were looking for a change, but we do have a new man looking to pursue close ties with russia and the west. do you think that dual course is possible? >> well, i think that mikheil saakashvili will have to choose. he may not be loyal to rushe splittic -- russia politically. he'll continue his own foreign policy. he's been manoeuvring between russia and the west. if he's serious about joining the european union, they will require him to worsen relations with russia. that happened with ukraine. i don't see how it will be avoided by georgia. >> you think he'll have to choose, he can't pursue both tracks? >> if the foreign policy of the european union changes, and sees russia as a threat tore competitor, it will be a very happy one for everyone, because then georgia will be able to develop close ties with russia and the rest of europe. right now the stans of the european union is anti-rush j. and the media. >> what overtures will russia make to the new leadership to try to improve ties? >> already tourism started between russia an
on foreign policy you're seeing a robust left presence. i want to go back. i think the more interesting thing here is the new coalitions forming. when you see code pink and freedom work joining together for a rally. >> that means the world is over. >> that means america has to is the up and take notice we're doing something really troubling. hopefully the president will show leadership and take accountability for it. >> in a weird way not everything has to be partisan. >> lets not go too crazy. >> not get ahead of ourselves. waiting for president obama to speak at the welcoming ceremony for new fbi director james comey. >>> former vice president dick cheney cast in a new light. we will discuss cheney doctrine and peter baker's incredibly awesome new book next on "now." ready to run your lines? okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ]
hatred and extremism throughout the region. but foreign policy is not a zero-sum game. if we can find ways to resolve disputes peacefully, we are wise to explore them. engagement is not appeasement, nor is it containment. we know what those are, we know where they lead, and we will not pursue them. and president obama has repeatedly made clear that words are not enough. action must match words. we understand why this is so important to so many people. because we've all been to yad vashem. earlier this year, i had the opportunity to revisit yad vashem. i had been there before, but this time was special for, because i brought my son, ziller, with me. i wanted him to see the harsh realities of the depths of evil, and the beautiful tribute to the victims of the past. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] ways demand commitment, sacrifice, and courage. tolerance, equality, and justice around the globe. and it demands that we remember the timeless questions of rabbi hillel, "if i am not for myself, who will be for me
friendship ith other countries. if you follow iraq's foreign policy, you would see that the iraqis think independently and not according to the interest of any others. we have a partnership an agreement with the united states. this is something some other countries do not like. that we like it, this is what matters. be believed to have a strong relation within the united states. if others do not agree, it is their problem. they cannot impose anything on the iraqis. if they want to be our friends our friendship does not impose on us being enemies of others. >> how do you respond to critics -- this is not coming from me, but a question from someone else -- say you are consolidating power and this has adversely affected iraq's democratic process? >> the constitution and ruling in iraq gives prerogative. this is something i state clearly. let me know when i act in an unconstitutional way. if i act in a way that is not acceptable to some of our partners, as long as i am committing to respecting the constitution and as long as i use my prerogative in a constitutional way, there should ot be a
security adviser reordered priorities on foreign policy and this is all part of that. explain what you think it happening and how it's perceived overseas. >> the administration is stating a new approach to the region in which they are being pretty explicit about u.s. difficulty in determining the outcome of what they view the civil war in syria, rather than try to pretend they can shape it decisively. pulling back from that. described the approach generally as one of strategic humility recognizing there are limits to american power as we certainly saw it in the iraq war and afghanistan. i think what's bothering the people, the situation in syria is so violent, the loss of life so great, it's going to get worse this winter. we're going to have tens of thousands of people suffering in the cold and dying i fear. it's understandable that members of congress are upset. i haven't heard anybody, including the angry senators, propose a strategy that's much more coherent than what the administration is putting out. >> you were the first to report on how angry the saudis are, angry about the pre
mccain and senator gram are just on a warpath in general about the obama administration foreign policy in the middle east arguing it is failing .. in many dimensions. i think there are so many elements that they oppose, the one i would focus on for your viewers is, i think the job that they have done communicating with even traditional and close friends and allies, the uae, jordan would be two obvious examples, has not been what you would expect or indeed what the u.s. needs right now. this period of change in the region you have got to really stand close to all the people who matter in terms of the execution of foreign policy. >> rose:. >> maliki is not only a tyrant but from the beginning he is sectarian to the core, and that means this shiite divide and he has taken the war to the sunni minority in iraq and i think in a way has done sort of iran's bidding in that way but i think even if you set the war in syria aside, he would have an enormous problem on his hands because, on his hands because he has not -- he has not tried to be inclusive in the way that he has governed iraq, and
. let's close with free trade. you're on the board of an organization called just foreign policy, and that organization is offering a reward to anyone who can give it a copy of the negotiating text of the trans-pacific partnership agreement. any takers so far? >> not so far. so the idea here is that we do have people involved in negotiating process, they have access to at least parts of the deal. so the hope is that someone from good conscience, presumably more than, you know, the hope of getting a big reward, will feel, you know, feel the urge to make it public and, you know, the organization just foreign policy -- i'm on the board, but i don't play an active role in running it -- will be happy to then post on the web so that, you know, people across the country can really, you know, in all the countries will have an opportunity to see it. >> so in the last word here, both of you, the argument is this trans-pacific partnership agreement will ensure a freer flow of goods and greater prosperity. the other side of it really serves essentially what we know about it, the corporate in
intentions, what they call leadership intentions, foreign policy objectives, human rights and then threats of the financial system. i find the last one to the financial system. what threats to the financial system does the vatican pose? >> that's a bit of a head scratcher because it doesn't have a particularly large amount of economic clout. occasionally they make comments about policy suggestion for how to help the world economy and how to help the world develop particularly in the developing world but it doesn't wield a lot of financial power. it isn't that big financially. it does have an institute. now, there's the institute for the works of religion which is kind of a bank that's set up to help coordinate charitable activities and currently the pope -- both pope francis and pope benedict had been working to kind of clean up some of the activity and put the vatican bank in a more rigorous footing. but it's a small bank in the scale of things. and so i don't really know what kind of threats they would imagine the holy sea would pose. >> it's very, very interesting i appreciate you givin
on the president's foreign policy, failures we take up with the a-team, stay with us, much more ahead. >> laughingstock. that is what leading republican senator john boa boar aso calls kathleen sebelius, he is next. so ally bank has a raise your rate cd that wothat's correct.a rate. cause i'm really nervous about getting trapped. why's that? uh, mark? go get help! i have my reasons. look, you don't have to feel trapped with our raise your rate cd. if our rate on this cd goes up, yours can too. oh that sounds nice. don't feel trapped with the ally raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. lou: a third gun manufacturing company has announced it is leaving the state of new york over governor andrew cuomo's sweeping new anti-gun laws. american tactical imports, the name of the firm is moving to south carolina taking a reported to have million dollars in recesses with it, one of the nation's oldest and largest gun manufacturers. it may be arriving in some form. a team of computer experts is being brought in to help the obama administration determine whether there is of fakes
views, thank you. >> thank you. lou: much more on the president's foreign policy, failures we take up with the a-team, stay with us, much more ahead. >> laughingstock. that is what leading republican senator john boa boar aso calls kathleen sebelius, he is next. so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7. i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel that in your muscles? i do... drink water. it's a long story. well, not having branches let's us give you great rates and service. i'd like that. a new way to bank. a better way to save. ally bank. your money needs an ally. once wrote something on a sheet of paper and placed it in his factory for all to see. ♪ four simple words where the meaning has never been lost. the challenge always accepted. and the calling forever answered. ♪ introducing the all-new 2014 s-class. mercedes-benz. the best or nothing. lou: a third gun manufacturing company has announced it is leaving the state of new york over governor andrew
strategy in the iranian foreign policy. the essential question is did sanctions work? >> it's difficult to come up with an explanation as to why it is in the presidential elections six of the seven candidates criticized the previous negotiator. unless there was some impact sanctions were having on the debate in iran. it's difficult to see why it is his focus on the economy would have been so successful unless the sanctions were having some impact in iran's economy. it's difficult to see why it is that after several years which iran seemed entirely uninterested in a nuclear deal we have a new nuclear negotiating team that is obviously interested in reaching a deal as quickly as possible. unless the sanctions were having some impact on iran. and i think one of the people whose opinion we should listen to in the matter is mr. -- who said repeatedly the sanction we're having a dramatic impact on iran. and it change and approach was necessary. so from the perspective of the obama administration, -- as i have written several monograph. the obama team from the beginning always thought the sanc
of the faith. i came to realise that islamism was a grievance. up until that point i was aggrieved by foreign policy. islamism was the largest obstacle preventing muslim societies from progressing. i was someone driven by a sense of injustice. i wanted to seek for justice. that would entail challenging the islamist ideology. if i realised that it was an obstacle to the advancement of muslim society. we grounded quinn lamb. >> we have a question from a huer. >>> jd rosen asks is reduction of drone war fair an effective countermeasure against new extremist recruitment? >> so i've been critical of uab, drone strikes. if the policy is carrick cattured as democracy at the barrel of the gun, was bush's stance. if the leadership of al qaeda was dealt with by drone strikes, president obama felt he could deal with the problem. it's an ideology, an inurgency, not just an organization. president obama's organization said al qaeda inspired terrorist. it's the end product. >> you write in reference to al qaeda - you can't kill an idea. ideas are bulletproof. what is it that the united states can do. what
. if you follow iraq's foreign policy you would see iraq is acting independently and freely according to its own interest and not according to the interest of any other country. we have a partnership and agreement with the united states but this is something some countries do not like but we like it because we believe nits our interest to have relationship with the united states. if others do not agree that's their problem. they cannot impose anything on iraqis. if they want to be our friend. our friendship does not impose on us being enmies of others. >> how do you respond to critics -- this is a question asked by somebody else -- who say you are consolidating power around you and this has adversely affected iraq's democratic process? >> the constitution is in iraq. it gives peroggatives and i state let me know when i act in an unconstitutional way. if i act in a way that is not accept to believe some of our partners this is something else. as long as i'm committed to respecting the constitution and as long as i use my prerogatives in a constitutional way there shouldn't be a problem
in those shadows, but his insights have helped shape the key foreign policy decisions of the last three presidents. the first thing we asked morell about was the last thing he did at the c.i.a.: taking part in the damage assessment on edward snowden, the n.s.a. contractor who leaked classified documents about america's secret electronic surveillance programs. >> mike morell: i do not believe he was a whistleblower. i do not believe he is a hero. i think he has betrayed his country. >> miller: how serious a hit is that to national security? >> morell: i think this is the most serious leak-- the most serious compromise of classified information in the history of the u.s. intelligence community. >> miller: because of the amount of it? or the type? >> morell: the amount and the type. >> miller: but of the hundreds of pages of n.s.a. documents that snowden has leaked, morell pointed to one in particular that has caused a great deal of damage to u.s. intelligence. it's a copy of the top secret document the c.i.a. calls its" black budget." what value would that have to an adversary? >> morell:
-- on how to achieve a foreign- policy objective. in on personal cell phone calls, does that go too far? guest: our leaders need to apply a balancing test. they have to weigh the foreign intelligence game from such a sensitive axes, like you are saying, in particular intercept of a foreign leader's phone call. a foreign-policy flap would result if it was disclosed. you have to apply that balancing. i think judging from the newspapers that is what the white house is doing this week. they are reviewing the posture of the intelligence community on these collection priorities. are going to apply this test to see what makes sense for the country. appropriate?back guest: it is safe to say the snow back -- the snowden relation did -- revelation caused blowback. host: he was a game changer in all this, would you agree? caller: i think so because this is one of the greatest leaks and compromises in american intelligence in our history. it is the equivalent of giving the other team our playbook. going to be looking back on the snowden years for years to come, perhaps as a point when some of our c
are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no benefits, we do not need security. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our methods adaptive? >> it has changed in relatively significant ways. it is a far more diffuse threat than it was 10 or 15 years ago. it is not necessarily align to buy group, but principally by ideology and other driving fact there's, -- driving factors. secondly, the threat seems to progress at times very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today could be on our doorstep tomorrow. lastly, they do not necessarily appear based on their actions in recent actions are indicators of that. big and complex attacks are their goal or their aim to accomplish their objectives. relatively small in comparison attacks that are relatively simple to put together and execute seem to be a preference. they have the same tools we all have to communicate in a
care system. >>> plus, a tough week for the president's foreign policy. new revelations about u.s. spying on allies, including the bugging of the german chancellor's phone. undermines critical relationships at a sensitive time. >>> and does the mideast trust this president? the fallout between syria and iran. the conflicts of global influences ahead. our roundtable is talking about politics and parenting this week after maryland's attorney general is spotted at a beach party where mine oors are drink. and nbc's brian williams reflects on hurricane sandy, one year ago. the wounds that haven't healed on the jersey shore are personal to him. all of that is ahead on "meet the press" on sunday, october 27. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning to you. obama care fix is on, but will it work? here are some of the latest developments. the end of november is the timeline the administration is now targeting to have the obama care website running smoothly. the latest report is that 700,000 appl
talking about his heart transplant surgery and foreign policy issues including trusting president obama. >> rose: you don't believe the president of the united states, do you. >> no. >> rose: you don't believe he has the best interest in the united states in terms oour national security in the middle east. >> i don't believe he does. >> rose: and you don't believe his word can gee trusted. >> correct. >> rose: that's serious. >> it certainly is. >> rose: to say that to the president of the united states. >> that's right. >> rose: in a democratic country. >> i think this president is doing damage to our standing, to our capacity to influence events. we are rapidly eroding our ability to have any impact on what's going on in the middle east. i've lived with this disease for 35 years. >> rose: you knew you would die. >> i knew i would die of heart disease. my father had and i expected to but when that time came i was at peace. there was no pain involved or discomfort. it was not frightening. i wanted to talk to my family about final arrangements. it was more difficult for them than
it sooner? in foreign policy, doing the right thing is not the only thing. you also have to do the right thing at the right time. why did it take so long to reach this conclusion? and now we find ourselves in a situation where fighting on behalf of those who promote freedom and liberty and tolerance is harder than ever and may be impossible. why did we do this, but sooner? -- why did we not do this, but sooner? it is harder than ever and might be impossible. >> the syrian opposition from the beginning was atomized. that is how it survived the regime's oppression. there was no national leadership. it is very hard to build up something that itself is still very incoherent. it took a long time for the opposition coalition to come together. you are right, we only recognized it in december, 2012. but it was only formed in mid- november. we recognized it as the legitimate representative three weeks after it was established. we have reduced the syrian embassy to the officer. and frankly, that officer is there because a lot of the syrian americans here want a syrian task force and he is able --
is my question. sooner?'t we do it in foreign policy, doing the right thing is not the only thing. you also have to do the right thing at the right time. why did it take so long to reach this conclusion? and now we find ourselves in a situation where fighting on behalf of those who promote freedom and liberty and tolerance is harder than ever and may be impossible. why did we do this, but sooner? -- why did we not do this, but sooner? >> the syrian opposition from the beginning was atomized. that is how it survived the regime's oppression. there was no national leadership. it is very hard to build up something that itself is still very incoherent. it took a long time for the opposition coalition to come together. you are right, we only recognized it in december, 2012. but it was only formed in mid- november. we recognized it as the legitimate representative three weeks after it was established. we have reduced the syrian to the officer. and frankly, that officer is there because a lot of the syrian americans here want a syrian task force and he is able to issue them. if i may continue,
this very important foreign-policy matter going forward. >> time for some fresh thinking in terms of u.s. policy in the post-pullout? >> we are focused on providing the necessary assistance to a iraq to help them combat terrorism as well as the broader assistance to provide through the strategic framework agreement. that encompasses not just the security relationship, but an economic and political relationship. part of this -- part of what a for has been going to many years now is the efforts to resolve the political differences and divisions within that country peacefully and through politics rather than through file it conflict. violent conflict. the forces of al qaeda have been trying to disrupt that throughout this time. it is important that in spite of the differences that exist politically in the iraq that the parties and groups continues to resolve their differences peacefully, which further isolates the activities that al qaeda and him and straights what they are for all to see, which terribleeking of violence on innocent civilians which is damaging to every iraqi. our systems
of democratic leaders on foreign policy in the senate. it was a real warning shot. it was a letter to obama but it was really a broadside against and it said he is doing a of things wrong and has not fulfilled his promises and his governing -- and he is governing as a sectarian warlord and the u.s. is not holding him to account for it. he is allowing too much influence by iran which is also shiite which is the same as his government. they called that a malign influence which is one of the stronger terms applied recently. concerns really are, as i laid out in the context of the apaches, that since 2011, al- maliki has promised a number of times to have an inclusive power-sharing government. one was nominally set up. by the account of john mccain and others who wrote that has set abouti to dismantle that government or undermine it. he is accompanied this trip by a sunni defense minister and a ministero foreign representing other blocs. is that that is just for show and that he really intends to continue to govern from a shiite-first perspective and so far, he has been able to essentially
. it was signed by the most influential republican and a couple democratic leaders on foreign policy in the senate and it was a real warning shot. it was a letter to obama but it was really a broadside against maliki and it said, you know, he's doing any number of things wrong. he's, he hasn't fulfilled previous promises. he is governing, these were not the his words but he is governing as a sectarian warlord and the u.s. is not holding him to account for it and he is allowing too much influence by next door iran which of course is also shiite as is he, as is his government-led coalition n fact they called that aid maligned influence which is one of the stronger terms applied recently. and the, the concerns really are, as i laid out in the context of the apaches, look, i mean, since 2011 maliki has promised any number of times to have a, inclusive power-sharing government. in fact one was nominally set up, by the, account of john mccain and others who wrote that letter. maliki hashn said about systematically either dismantling that government or undermining it. and although he is accompanied here
've abandoned them, as we have done egypt. it's an interesting foreign policy we're witnessing. lieutenant colonel allen west who fights for us, worked for us in washington and now a fox news contributor, thanks so much. >> thanks for having me, brian. >> next up, hey, parents, do your kids love mac and cheese? there is big changes coming and you need to know about it because they're going to eat it anyway. reality show husband bill rancic is running into the studio right now, he'll be in last place of the new york city marathon. wisest kid? we need a new recipe. let us consult the scroll of infinite deliciousness. perfect. [ wisest kid ] campbell's has the recipes kids love. so good! [ wisest kid ] at campbellskitchen.com. [ gong ] m'm! m'm! good! female narrator: the mattress price wars are ending soon the mattress price wars are ending soon at sleep train. we've challenged the manufacturers to offer even lower prices. now it's posturepedic versus beautyrest with big savings of up to $400 off. serta icomfort and tempur-pedic go head-to-head with three years' interest-free financing, plus
policy on attracting foreign investment, some of those policies include immigration, the debt ceiling, and energy. it is moderated. [applause]
formulate an effective foreign and national security policy. we're looking for that. so we're looking for information that helps us -- >>. >> ifill: that's pretty broad though. >> of course it's broad. we're looking for information that help us understand how other countries think and how they plan to operate. and that can make our relationship with them much more affective and productive. >> ifill: is that what european nations are looking for as well? >> i think that european nations it are looking for some supervision and some limits. the nsa sucks in as much information as it does partly because it can. partly because of new information technologies, the internet, wireless, cell phones. and the europeans simply have a political culture that is more sensitive to privacy than in the united states. >> ifill: so they handle their intelligence differently than we would necessarily. >> well, they haven't made much more progress on these kinds of issues among themselves than they have with us. they don't have an eu-wide approach to intelligence. they have their individual member states b
an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the united states. therefore i have determined that it is necessary to continue the national emergency declared with respect to sudan and maintain and enforce the sanctions against sudan to respond to this threat. signed, barack obama, the white house, october 30, 2013. the speaker pro tempore: the message will be referred to the committee on foreign affairs and ordered printed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. gohmert: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today, it adjourn to meet at 10:00 a.m. on friday, november 1, 2013, unless it has received a message from the senate transmitting its concurrence in the house concurrent resolution 62, in which case the house shall stand adjourned pursuant to that concurrent resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. gohmert: pursuant to the order of the house today, mr. speaker, i move that the house do now hereby adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjo
to target foreign leaders' intentions to try to determine what the best policy might be for the united states of america? thing ithe first learned in intelligence school in 1963. leadership intentions, no matter what led -- level you are talking about. believe the allies have conducted any kind of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> are you familiar with a story from the former french head of the dcri? >> that is the french domestic intelligence organization. >> let me read you a quote. i am amazed by such disconcerting naÏvetÉ. you'd almost inc. our politicians don't bother to read the ports they get from their ourlligence -- think politicians don't bother to read the reports they get from their intelligence department. say, some of this reminds me of the classic movie casablanca. my god, there is gambling going on here. it is the same kind of thing. alexander, in your experience as director of the security agency, have allies in the united states engaged in anything that you call and espionage act toward the unit
foreign leaders' intentions to dry to determine the best policy for the united states of america? >> it's one of the first things i learned in intelligence school in 1983 that this is the fundmental given in the intelligence business is leadership intentions, no matter what level you're talking about. that can be military leaders as well. >> do you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence service, our leaders, or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> are you familiar with a story recently from the former french head of the direct -- well, the dcri -- are you familiar with that? >> that's the french domestic intelligence organization. >> let me read you a quote from that gentleman. quote, i'm amazed by such disconcerning naivety, he said in the interview. you'd think the politicians don't read reports they get from the intelligence services. he's talking about french spying on our allies including the united states of america. do you find that consistent with what you know as director of the nationa
did say in that statement and that these collection activities aimed at foreign leaders will not continue. i talked to a senior administration official earlier this evening who says that part of the statement is inaccurate. they are being changed on that basis. and in large part these policies and programs are continuing for the time being while all of this is being reviewed. as you mentioned, wolf, the folks on capitol hill want to take a look at this. but the white house maintains they are conducting their own internal review right now. there may be changes by the end of the year. >> the white house is adamant that the president didn't know about the eavesdropping on the german chancellor. president obama didn't know about certain aspects of the program, right? >> that's right. what the administration says in effect is that the president set the priorities and another official telling us he would have been briefed on the frame work of the program including that it may target the leaders of friends abroad without being told of the specific targets. that is what the admi
afternoon. i am going to start the first afternoon session. the topic is foreign intelligence surveillance. we are pleased to have as theesses, james baker with department of justice, office of intelligence, and policy review. judge james carr, a senior federal judge of the united states district court and formerly a judge from 2002 2008. sillinger, a former doj attorney at the computer crime and electrical property section. these make your remarks and then afterwards we will have five minutes for each of the board members. >> thank you very much. i would like to thank the board for inviting me back. it is an honor to be here and an honor to be able to discuss these kinds of issues in this type of setting. i appreciate the opportunity. i have just a couple of quick comments. is focus of our discussion on 702 of the fisa amendment act patriot act.e while these are very important statutorily authorized and judicial he reviewed surveillance programs involving the collections and communications -- collection of commit occasions and to medications data with many americans, they are only part of
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)